Open-Public-Records.com
Gilliam County, Oregon Public Records
 
Browse Public Records By State
Browse Public Records By County
 PUBLIC RECORDS SEARCH
  First Name Last Name City State  
 
Gilliam County, Oregon Public Records Resources & Searches

Search Gilliam County public records using best found research sources online. Look up recorded information of Gilliam County including demographics and local economy. Link to all levels of Gilliam County government and their sites with services which provide public information. Current economy, business and housing data. Read about up to date current events and what is occurring in any city of Gilliam County. Find out about the background of residents and recorded statistics. Request Gilliam County criminal records from law enforcement departments with access to the state's repository with official background check of arrests and convicted felonies. Access a directory aimed toward producing open public records and instant information available online. Gilliam County sources are added on a regular basis for the best and most current services.

Gilliam County, Crime Reports (2011)
Total Violent Crime:0
Murder And Nonnegligent Manslaughter:0
Forcible Rape:0
Robbery:0
Aggravated Assault:0
Total Property Crime:16
Burglary:4
Larceny Theft:12
Motor Vehicle Theft:0
Arson:0
Gilliam County, Census Data
Information About People and Demographics
Total population of persons residing within the County in 2010 1,871
Estimate of the County's total residency as of April 1, 20001,915
Percentage change of the total resident population as of April 1, 2000 to April 1, 2010-2%
Net change of residents' total population from April 1, 2000 to April 1, 2010-44
April 1, 2000 complete count of Countywide resident population1,915
Population estimate of residents less than 5 years of age80
July 1, 2009 estimated percentage of residents that are less than 5 years of age5%
July 1, 2009 estimate of residents that are less than 18 years of age293
July 1, 2009 estimated percentage of residents that are less than 18 years of age 18%
July 1, 2009 percentage estimate of residents that are 65 years of age and older23%
July 1, 2009 estimate of residents that are 65 years of age and older385
July 1, 2009 total estimate percentage of female residents49%
County's white resident population recorded in 20101,781
County's black resident population recorded in 20103
County's American Indian and Alaska Native resident populations recorded in 201019
County's Asian resident population recorded in 20103
County's Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander resident population recorded in 201013
Countywide 2010 resident population of two or more races26
Countywide 2010 resident population of Hispanic or Latino origin88
Non Hispanic white resident population in 20101,725
Countywide percentage of white residents in 201095%
Countywide percentage of black residents in 20100%
Countywide percentage of American Indian and Alaska Native residents in 20101%
Countywide percentage of Asian residents in 20100%
Countywide percentage of Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander in 20101%
Countywide percentage of Two or more races in 20101%
Countywide percentage of Hispanic or Latino Origin in 20105%
Countywide percentage of non Hispanic white in 201092%

Vital Statistics

Births and deaths occurring in Gilliam County
Births 200717
Deaths 200721
Infant death occurring within the County of persons one year of age or less in 20070
Percentage of persons with the same residence of one year or more from 2005 to 200987

Resident Background Information

Education and background history of Gilliam County Residents
Percentage of foreign born population in the County from 2005 to 20094%
Percentage of residents 5 years of age and older that speak languages other than English at home from 2005 to 20097%
Percentage of persons from 25 years of age and older with high a school education or higher from 2005 to 200988%
Percentage of persons from 25 years of age and older with bachelor's degree or higher from 2005 to 200920%
Total number of Veterans from 2005 to 2009227

Current Housing and Real Estate Data

Households located in Gilliam County
Average time spent commuting to work for person 16 years and over not working from their personal residence between 2005-200917
Housing unit estimates as of July 1, 20091,080
Net change of housing units estimates as of April 1, 2000 to July 1, 200937
Housing unit estimates - percent change, April 1, 2000 (base) to July 1, 20094%
Percentage of the County's housing units being occupied by owners between 2005 and 2009 69%
Median value of the County's housing units being occupied by owners between 2005 and 2009 $98,200
Percentage of housing in structure of multi dwelling units between 2005 and 20099%
Total number of households between 2005-2009816
Average size of households between 2005-20092

Gilliam County Employment Data

Income, earnings and payrolls of people residing within the County
Per capita income in the past 12 months in dollars adjusted to inflation in 2009 $25,349
2009 Countywide income of median households in Gilliam County$46,018
Percentage of persons living in poverty in the year 200913%
The personal income of persons employed in 2007$50
Per capita income of persons employed in 2007$29,853
Labor force of civilian workers in 20091,221
The unemployment of the civilian labor force in 200985
The rate of unemployed civilian labor force in 2009 7
Employment of person relating to all industries in 2007 1,417
Net change of employment in all industries between 2000 and 2007 114
People employed by the government in 2007 212
Earnings by persons working in all industries in 200737,312
Average earnings per job in all industries in 200726,332
Number of private non farm establishments in 2008 67
The employment of non farm pay for the period of March 12, 2008 0
Percentage change of private nonfarm employment for the pay period of March 12, 2008 0%
Total of non employer establishment in 2008 according to NAICS 101
Total NAICS 72 sales of accommodation and food services establishments with payrolls in 20071,505

People and Businesses

Firms and companies of Gilliam County
Total number of firms located in the County for the year 2007164
Total percentage of black owned private firms in 20070%
Total percentage of American Indian and Alaska Native owned firms in 20070%
Total percentage of Asian owned firms in 20070%
Total percentage of Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander owned firms in 2007 0%
Total percentage of Native Hispanic owned private firms in 20070%
Total percentage of Women owned private firms in 20070%
Value for shipments from manufacturers according to NAICS 31-33 in 2007 0
Sales of establishments with payroll from merchant wholesalers according to NAICS 42 in 200731,643
Sales of establishments with payroll from retailers in 2007 13,474
Per capita sales of establishments with payroll from retailers in 2007 8,141

Land Valuation

Property value and Gilliam County territory
2009 totals of building permits for new private housing units in 2009 0
The valuation of all new private housing units authorized by building permits in 2009 0
Adjusted 2007 acres of land in farms733,387
Total expenditures by the federal government for the 2008 fiscal year21,385
Per capita total expenditures by the federal government for the 2008 fiscal year12,241
Size in square miles of land as of 20001,204
Population per square mile in the year 20102
Gilliam County Public Records
Map of Gilliam County, Oregon
Ask A Question About Gilliam County
Type in your Question:
Your Name or Nickname
2 x 2 = ?
Gilliam County, Arrest Records
Published current arrests including charges including information provided by law enforcement and news
No result
Gilliam County, Most Wanted
View a list of names, offender descriptions, location, charges and other information of persons wanted by police and sheriffs
No result
Gilliam County, Mugshots
Photos of arrested persons, offenders in custody and booking information
No result
Gilliam County, Missing Children
Collected data of endangered children, runaways, family and non family abductions
No result
Gilliam County, Public Information
Recent publications of obituaries, city news and calendars, sex offender lists, birth and divorce records, view court criminal actions, civil lawsuits and bankruptcy filings
Immigration detainer changes spread across Oregon: Noteworthy quotes not included in original cover
Reporting this case involved multiple reporters and continued throughout last week. These are some of the quotes that stood out but didn't make it into those stories. Several Oregon counties last week stopped holding undocumented immigrants for the sole purpose of deportation, a move that is quickly spreading across the state and, legal experts say, possibly the nation.Sheriff’s officials announced the policy change after a federal judge ruled that Clackamas County violated one woman’s Fourth Amendment rights by holding her for immigration authorities without probable cause, after her original booking charges had cleared.Following the ruling, agencies in Washington, Clackamas and Multnomah counties announced that they had updated their detainer policies Wednesday. At least six counties have since followed suit.By Friday, Multnomah County had lifted immigration holds on 50 jail inmates; Clackamas County had released two inmates with such holds. Reporting this case involved multiple reporters and continued throughout last week. These are some of the quotes that stood out but didn't make it into those stories.Darrell Fuller, general manager of the Oregon State Sheriffs' Association (OSSA)On whether the policy change could save sheriff's agencies money: A lot of sheriffs are in a position where they’re having to release inmates early anyway. If someone on an ICE detainer is let go, there’s someone ready to take that bed. I don’t think it really saves a lot of money; it lets somebody else eat that food and stay in that bed. It’s one more bed for somebody who deserves it. Gilliam County Sheriff Gary Bettencourt, OSSA president On collaboration between local and federal law enforcement: I think we worked cooperatively with our federal partners ...but I certainly don’t want to violate somebody’s constitutional rights. We’re all about protecting peoples’ rights and the constitution. That is what we signed up to do. Stephen Manning, immigration attorney and member of the American Immigration Lawyers Association of Oregon On how the new policy changes the way local law enforcement and federal immigration officials interact: It has always been bad policing to collaborate with ICE. Now they have a legal and financial reason -- very clear -- to actually no longer feel bullied by ICE. I think ICE spent a lot of time hiding the ball and they have gazillions of dollars but they would rather not spend any of that on some of their core missions. Instead they wanted the counties, our sheriffs to spend their dollars. Juliet Stumpf, Lewis and Clark professor specializing in criminal and immigration lawOn how the judge's decision makes it possible for people to sue for false imprisonment: Now that this decision is out saying (immigration detainers are) a request…and not a requirement ... at this point and time, the counties are no longer able to say, 'Well we were acting because we thought we had to.' They don’t have that defense anymore ... The bottom line for the decision is that it becomes very risky for a county to continue to hold a non-citizen on the basis of an ICE request. If they’re not getting that support or protection from litigation from ICE, counties are going to start thinking much more seriously about whether they want to engage in the detainer process ... So even though the county may have had the sense that it was cooperating with the federal government, when the county gets in trouble because of the detainer, it’s on its own. I find this fascinating because it’s a decision that on it’s face looks like it only applies to the parties, and then it’s having this domino effect on the counties. The magistrate judge didn’t issue an order saying you need to change your policy. All she said was there’s liability here. --Andrea Castillo
Happening April 21 2014 - Source: http://www.oregonlive.com/pacific-northwest-news/index.ssf/2014/04/immigration_detainer_changes_s_1.html

Immigration detainer changes spreading across Oregon; national implications possible
At least nine Oregon counties have put a stop to holding undocumented immigrants in jail for the sole purpose of deportation, a shift that legal experts say will inevitably spread across the state and, possibly, the nation. At least nine Oregon counties have put a stop to holding undocumented immigrants in jail for the sole purpose of deportation, a shift that legal experts say will inevitably spread across the state and, possibly, the nation. Sheriff’s agencies in Deschutes and Marion counties confirmed Thursday that they have joined their metro-area counterparts in suspending the policy, which keeps suspected undocumented immigrants in jail for deportation after their booking charges have cleared. The Norcor regional facility, which serves the counties of Hood River, Wasco, Gilliam, Sherman and sometimes Wheeler, is also affected by the new policy. Sheriff’s officials in Washington, Multnomah and Clackamas counties announced the policy change Wednesday, after a federal judge ruled that Clackamas County violated one woman’s Fourth Amendment rights by holding her for immigration authorities without probable cause.Those counties' jails will no longer hold such individuals for the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement without a court order or warrant, said Lt. Steve Alexander, a Multnomah County sheriff’s spokesman. He said ICE will continue to have access to a roster of foreign-born detainees, but that the local agencies will no longer prevent certain immigrants from posting bail. The judge's decision has immigrant rights advocates cheering and other sheriff’s offices across Oregon racing to revise their detainer policies. Liliana Luna, an immigrant rights organizer with Oregon DreamActivist, said every bit of action and advocacy was required to get to this point. Last month, the organization supported close to 120 immigrants in crossing the border from Mexico as part of an anti-deportations protest. “Once they know this policy is in place, that it’s no longer legal to hold people for immigration, this is going to open the door for the community to trust the authorities,” she said. It is unclear how the rest of Oregon’s 36 counties will respond to the ruling, though Gilliam County Sheriff Gary Bettencourt said it’s probable they will follow the metro area’s precedent. “This ruling leaves us no other options at this point,” said Bettencourt, who’s also president of the Oregon State Sheriffs’ Association. “It kind of leaves us in a situation where we don’t have much of a choice.” Bettencourt said Oregon sheriff’s offices have worked cooperatively with their federal partners, but certainly don’t want to violate anyone’s constitutional rights. Maria Miranda-Olivares sued Clackamas County after being held 19 hours after completing a two-day jail sentence while U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials investigated her residency status. She had been arrested March 14, 2012, on a domestic violence charge.Under the Secure Communities program, used to identify deportable immigrants in U.S. jails, ICE asks local authorities to hold certain inmates for up to two business days until they can be taken into federal custody. Most Oregon counties previously honored those requests.But U.S. District Court Judge Janice M. Stewart ruled Friday that county officials misinterpreted such requests as mandatory. She sided with a federal appeals court decision last month, which said localities are not required to abide by ICE requests and could be held accountable for wrongful immigration detentions. “This court concludes that ... the Jail was at liberty to refuse ICE’s request to detain Miranda-Olivares if that detention violated her constitutional rights. Accordingly, the County cannot avail itself of the defense that its practice and custom did not cause the allegedly unlawful detention,” she wrote.ICE itself has said the detainer requests are discretionary, though many localities have treated them as orders because of a reference to federal law, which says local police “shall” hold immigrants for deportation under such instances. “The fact that the detainers contain both language of request and command has lead to conflicting interpretations as to whether the immigration detainers provide legal authority for the continued custody of the people named in the detainers,” Clackamas County Sheriff Craig Roberts wrote in an announcement of the new policy. Portland Immigration Attorney Stephen Manning said even though Stewart’s decision is not binding for sheriff’s offices outside Clackamas County, it sends a clear signal. And with the tri-county agencies now on board, Manning said, “that in effect makes Oregon a bellwether state.” “This changes the game,” he said. Lewis and Clark College Professor Juliet Stumpf, who specializes at the intersection of criminal and immigration law, agreed. She said the bottom line is that it would be very risky for a county to continue detaining immigrants at ICE’s request. “Oregon may actually be one of the leading areas of the country in basically rejecting the idea that state and local law enforcement officers should pay attention to the detainers,” she said. Stumpf predicts the regional changes will snowball and spread across the country. Other cities, including Miami, New Orleans and, most recently, Philadelphia, have updated their policies on ICE holds. In December 2012, the Obama administration announced that immigrants arrested for minor crimes would no longer be targeted for deportation. The move was partly a response to pushback from immigrant advocates and some city officials against the Secure Communities program, which they contend tears families apart and breaches the trust between community residents and local law enforcement.Sheriff Dan Staton changed Multnomah County’s detention policy last April in favor of releasing undocumented immigrants jailed for low-level crimes. Wednesday’s announcement extends that policy even further.The American Civil Liberties Union filed a lawsuit last June, arguing that ICE holds violate state law and constitutional rights. Legislative Director Becky Straus said the entanglement between local police and immigration enforcement harms communities by making residents less likely to reach out about public safety issues or social services.'We’ve been concerned about that relationship for quite some time and we are encouraged to see that courts are now concerned as well,' she said.On March 29, Miranda-Olivares pleaded guilty to one charge of contempt of court, and was sentenced to 48 hours in jail and probation. She received credit for time served and should have been freed the same day.However, jail officials detained her until the next day, giving ICE officials time to pick her up.In her ruling, Stewart wrote that the county’s practice of keeping immigrants in jail for ICE was tantamount to Miranda-Olivares being taken into custody a second time, even though her charges had been settled. “The way I read this opinion is that the jails need to take civil rights of their detainees seriously,” said David Henretty, Miranda-Olivares’ attorney. “If they fail to do so, they could be held accountable. I think that’s an important message out there to anybody, whether you’re a noncitizen, an immigrant or whoever.”--Andrea Castillo Molly Harbarger of The Oregonian staff contributed to this report
Happening April 17 2014 - Source: http://www.oregonlive.com/pacific-northwest-news/index.ssf/2014/04/federal_ruling_sparks_halt_on.html

Six Oregon counties join metro area sheriff's offices in suspending immigration detainer policies
Sheriff's offices in Deschutes, Wasco, Sherman, Gilliam and Hood River counties have joined the Portland metro area in changing a policy that keeps suspected undocumented immigrants in jail for deportation. Sheriff's offices in Deschutes, Wasco, Sherman, Gilliam and Hood River counties have joined the Portland metro area in changing a policy that keeps suspected undocumented immigrants in jail for deportation. The latter four agencies use the Norcor regional facility in The Dalles. Wheeler County, which contracts with either Norcor or Grant County's jail, will also be affected by the new policy. The decision follows a federal judge's ruling that Clackamas County had violated a woman's constitutional rights by holding her for immigration authorities without probable cause.Previously, most Oregon counties would hold an undocumented inmate at the request of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement. Such immigrants would be held for deportation after their original booking charges were cleared. Gilliam County Sheriff Gary Bettencourt, who serves as president of the Oregon state Sheriffs' Association, said he believes all Oregon counties will have to follow the precedent set by Washington, Clackamas and Multnomah County sheriff's agencies, announced Wednesday night. Bettencourt said he hasn't yet talked to sheriffs in other counties, 'but with the ruling I really don’t know what option it leaves them.' 'It kind of leaves us in a situation where we don’t’ have much of a choice,' he said. Read more about the immigration detainer ruling: Federal ruling sparks policy change for jailed immigrants facing deportation in metro area -- The OregonianClackamas County violated woman's Constitutional rights by holding her in jail at immigration agency's request, federal judge rules -- The OregonianA Portland Judge Ruled Some Federal Immigration Holds Are Illegal, Last Week. It's a Big Deal -- Portland Mercury --Andrea Castillo
Happening April 17 2014 - Source: http://www.oregonlive.com/pacific-northwest-news/index.ssf/2014/04/five_oregon_counties_join_metr.html

Gilliam County, Missing People
Currently missing persons sought by law enforcement derived from public and private sources
No result
Gilliam County, Crime News
Published news and events of criminal activity
Hermiston police arrest teen for rash of graffiti
Police say the 17-year-old is responsible for three incidents of graffiti in Hermiston, as well as dozens more in Boardman and Arlington.
March 27 2014 - Source: http://www.keprtv.com/news/local/Hermiston-police-arrest-teen-for-rash-of-graffiti-252728001.html

 

Home - Contact - About Us - Terms of Use - Articles

© 2013 Statistico Inc