• How do you get your record cleared of something you were charged with but never convicted and was dismissed?
    Where the records are appearing is an important factor. The Washington state patrol's Identification and Criminal History Section is the central repository for criminal history record information (CHRI) statewide. This service also offers the following in case of errors: Updating existing CHRI, Non-conviction CHRI Review, Modifications/Challenges, Compromised Identity Claims, Questions Regarding CHRI. This is on the Washington state patrol's website under 'Updating An Existing State Criminal History'
    Open-Public-Records.com (Staff)
  • What are census tracts? I see them but there's not explanation of what they are!?
    Census tracts are subdivisions of a county that contain a unique numeric code. These are small areas where the population ranges from 1,200 minimum to 8,000 maximum and average approximately 4,000 residents. Prior to the census tracts, block numbering areas (BNA)s were used for cities where tracts did not exist. Then, in 1990 both were used to cover the entire United States. By the year 2000, the census tracts covered all of the U.S. In 2010 new tracts were introduced as a result of merging or separating due to population changes and were available to the public in December of 2010. The census program is offered only once every ten years and census tracts are aimed at being eventually permanent. This allows for comparisons from one decade to another. Once the tract has exceeded 8,000 residents, the tract is split to the extent of the population numbers being met. If the tract decreases in population below 1,200 residents, the tract with then be merged with a neighboring tract meeting the eligibility standards. The census tract relationship files in the geography portion of the census site shows the 2000 census tracts versus the 2010 census tracts comparisons.
    Open-Public-Records.com (Staff)
  • Where and how are some of the accident statistics compiled regarding the state of Washington?
    For statistics specific to Washington's transportation collisions, the Washington State Department of Transportation provides the public with their collected data. The data is not compiled of crash reports entered by other drivers but by collision reports submitted by law enforcement. Traffic fatalities in Washington are lower than the national average. Since 2006, total statewide fatal collisions dropped from 578 to 422 in 2010. Seattle with the largest population reported 26 fatalities, but Tukwila, Sea Tac, Lynnwood, Renton and Kent have higher per population rate of fatalities and injuries. Statistics also show that most fatal collisions occur during clear or partly cloudy days. This statistic is an example of data that can be misleading. There are fewer vehicles on the roads during bad weather and therefore will have less collisions. Another example of very similar data is the month where the most collisions occur. Summer time being the most desirable weather for driving, the month with the most reported collisions is July with 53 in 2010. Friday is the day of the week with the most accidents in all Washington public roads, with Saturday second and Monday a close third. Five o'clock is the peak hour of the day when collisions are most likely statewide. As for age groups, 16 to 30 year olds are involved in more fatal crashes than any other age group, but surprisingly drivers over 70 are a very close second in statistical standings. Women have less fatalities than men in just about every category.
    Open-Public-Records.com (Staff)